Sam Houston Electric Blog

Smoke Alarm Safety

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Smoke Alarm Safety

On average, eight people die in house fires every day in the U.S.—almost 3,000 people every year, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Although working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire nearly in half, roughly two-thirds of all house fire deaths still occur in homes without working smoke alarms.

Newer smoke alarm recommendations and technologies provide greater protection than ever before. Sam Houston Electric Cooperative has some tips for making sure your smoke alarms are working properly to keep your family safe.

  • Smoke detectors should be installed in every bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of multistory homes.
  • For the best protection, alarms should be interconnected so that they all sound if one sounds. Manufacturers now are producing battery-operated alarms that are interconnected by wireless technology.
  • Combination smoke alarms that include ionization and photoelectric alarms offer the most comprehensive protection. An ionization alarm is more responsive to flames, while a photoelectric alarm is more responsive to a smoldering fire.
  • Hardwired smoke detectors with battery backups are more reliable than those powered solely by batteries.
  • Install smoke detectors at least 10 feet from cooking appliances to reduce nuisance alarms. Alarms installed within 10–20 feet of a cooking appliance must be photoelectric or have a hush feature to temporarily reduce the alarm sensitivity.
  • If possible, alarms should be mounted in the center of the ceiling. If mounted on a wall, an alarm should be located 6–12 inches below the ceiling.
  • Smoke alarms should be tested once a month, and batteries should be replaced in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, at least once a year. If an alarm “chirps” or “beeps” to indicate low batteries, they should be replaced immediately.
  • Occasionally dust or lightly vacuum the exterior of the alarm.
  • Smoke alarms should be replaced in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, at least every 10 years.

POSTED BY RACHEL FREY, CCC, COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST



More Articles

30 Dec

Saving money on utility bills through greater energy efficiency is a year-round objective for many co-op members, but the methods for achieving this goal change with the seasons in Texas.  Several factors affect energy efficiency, including weather, the age and condition of your home and desired comfort levels. During fall and winter months, when it’s cooler outdoors, you’ll want a warm home as you seek to keep the cold air...

29 Dec

Going on a diet this January? Opening a savings account? Joining a gym? Here’s another resolution—and it might be easier to keep for longer than two weeks: Do one thing a month that will make your home more energy efficient.  Here are 12 ideas: January: Get into the habit of turning your thermostat down by about 10 degrees before your family turns in for the night or leaves home in the morning....

28 Dec

When you remove your outdoor lights after the holidays are over, do it safely.  Suit up. Wear thick gloves and protective glasses before doing any electrical work at home.  Look up. Note whether light strands are touching power lines hanging close to your roof. If they are, do not touch! If they’re clear, use extra care when removing. Report low-hanging lines to your electric cooperative. Unplug. If strands of lights are...

27 Sep

Who doesn’t want to save big while celebrating the cooperative difference? On Oct. 14, you can do just that. Sam Houston Electric Cooperative joins Touchstone Energy Cooperatives in announcing the first-ever National Co-op Connections® Day. National Co-op Connections Day celebrates National Cooperative Month by providing members with additional savings and deals when they use The One Card That Does It All® at participating retailers. Flash sales and unique offers will be...

8 Sep

Electricity plays a major role in our everyday lives, and it is a powerful resource that we all know should be respected and treated with care. Unfortunately, our children often do not understand the dangers of electricity. At Sam Houston Electric Cooperative, we encourage you to share electrical safety tips and lessons with your little ones as often as possible. We also understand their attention spans run short, so here are a few creative...

30 Aug

As long as you’re blowing leaves and caulking around windows this fall, put one more chore on your to-do list: Add some attic insulation. The time to get your home in shape for heating season is early fall, long before you need to turn the heat on. If your attic doesn’t have enough insulation—or if, over the years, it has come loose—it won’t keep your...

27 Jul

Furnishing a college dorm room comes with a lot of options for personalization — from bedding and décor to kitchen supplies and electronics. One essential for the college residence is safety. There is a tendency for college students to want to bring everything they own. The limited number of electric outlets in student rooms can tempt many to use multiple extension cords and power strips, which can cause cords to overheat, creating shock...

19 Jul

There are three primary types of lighting: ambient (general lighting), task lighting and accent lighting. As lighting technologies continue to advance, Sam Houston Electric Cooperative encourages its members to try new shapes and types of bulbs. Click on the picture to learn more about the appropriate uses for different types of bulbs on the market.  Posted by Rachel Frey, Communications Specialist

7 Jul

Your refrigerator is one of the largest, most-used appliances in your home. It requires only minimal maintenance – just simple cleaning of the condenser coils, which disperse heat. If the coils are covered with dust, gunk or pet hair, they cannot diffuse the heat properly and will not run efficiently. A bigger problem can result if the compressor burns out from having to run constantly because of the grimy coating. This can be an expensive...

9 Jun

Let me preface by saying that I like my smartphone. It has amazing capabilities. On the other hand, the ever-present little gadgets can cause us to miss out on life-enriching experiences.  On a recent Thursday evening, I was at Caney Creek High School to present scholarships to a couple of outstanding students. Having presented there in years past, I knew to go straight to the room where presenters gather prior to the program.  ...

Page 1 of 5 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›